Central Alabama Veterans Healthcare System location & phone number

  • Our Address:
    2400 Hospital Road
    Tuskegee, Alabama

    Phone Number:
    (334) 727-0550
    We are open 24 hours a day 7 days a week.

Rehabs at Central Alabama Veterans Healthcare System in Tuskegee Alabama

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10 Most Recent Comments

  • 2
    tuskegee,AL
    2 years, 8 months Ago
    Central Alabama Veterans Health Care System shared a link.
  • 0
    tuskegee,AL
    2 years, 8 months Ago
    Central Alabama Veterans Health Care System shared Veterans Health Administration (VHA) - U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs's photo.
  • 2
    tuskegee,AL
    2 years, 9 months Ago
    Central Alabama Veterans Health Care System shared a link.
  • 0
    tuskegee,AL
    2 years, 9 months Ago
    Central Alabama Veterans Health Care System shared The Post-9/11 GI Bill, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs's note.
  • 0
    tuskegee,AL
    2 years, 9 months Ago
    Central Alabama Veterans Health Care System shared U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs's video.
  • 0
    tuskegee,AL
    2 years, 9 months Ago
    Central Alabama Veterans Health Care System created an event.
  • 6
    tuskegee,AL
    2 years, 9 months Ago
    Central Alabama Veterans Health Care System shared U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs's photo.
  • 5
    tuskegee,AL
    2 years, 9 months Ago
    Veterans Affairs First African American Hospital Director By Darlene Richardson, Historian, VHA Office of Communications Colonel Joseph Henry Ward, M.D., was the first African American hospital director in Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) history. He was appointed in January 1924 to oversee the Veterans Bureau’s first and only racially segregated veterans hospital in Tuskegee, Alabama, and worked with Veterans Bureau Medical Director, Dr. Charles M. Griffith, until he assumed responsibility as Medical Officer in Charge on July 7, 1924. The hospital was staffed entirely by employees of African American heritage until 1954 when racial segregation officially ended in VA hospitals. Joseph Henry Ward was born on August 26, 1872 in North Carolina, but his family later moved to Indiana. Little is known of his early life, but by 1897 he had graduated from the Physio-Medical School of Indiana and established one of the first hospitals for African Americans in Indianapolis by 1910. He enlisted for military service during World War I on August 10, 1917 and served with the 92nd Division medical corps. The 92nd Division was one of two segregated units of the Army, at that time, and Dr. Ward became one of only two African American officers in the medical corps to attain the rank of Major during the war. He was honorably discharged from active service on May 29, 1919 and continued in the reserves until September 23, 1934. He left the Army at the rank of Lieutenant Colonel and returned to his practice in Indianapolis. On February 12, 1923, Vice President Calvin Coolidge dedicated a new veterans hospital in Tuskegee, Alabama for African American veterans who served in World War I. The segregated hospital was authorized as part of the First Langley Act in March 1921 and constructed by the Treasury Department for the Public Health Service, which had been charged along with the Bureau of War Risk Insurance with providing hospitals and medical care to World War I veterans. While it was still under construction, Congress consolidated all World War I veterans programs in August 1921 into a new bureau known as the Veterans Bureau. President Warren Harding signed Executive Order 3669 on April 29, 1922 and transferred the Tuskegee veterans hospital, along with roughly 60 other Public Health Service veterans’ hospitals, to the new Veterans Bureau. Tuskegee was known as U.S.V.H. (U.S. Veterans Hospital) No. 91 until 1930, when it became part of the Veterans Administration. It was the second Federal hospital established specifically for African Americans military veterans, but the only one that ever operated as an entirely segregated hospital. The first one opened in 1870 as the Southern Branch of the National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers (VHA origins) in Hampton, Virginia. The Southern Branch in Hampton was not a segregated facility, although it could have been, as the managers established it for African Americans and other Union veterans who preferred a more moderate climate. At the time, the other three National Homes were located in the North (Maine, Wisconsin, and Ohio). Much to their surprise, former U.S. Colored Troops preferred the Central Branch in Dayton over Hampton until the early 20th century. Getting the Tuskegee facility off the ground and operational was not an easy task in the racially segregated South. In June 1923, four months after the hospital was dedicated, Veterans Bureau Administrator General Frank T. Hines announced his intention to staff the hospital with African American medical professionals. The announcement created an uproar in the community pitting Ku Klux Klan members against anyone who wanted the hospital staffed according to General Hines’ wishes. General Hines was not easily intimidated and community committee was formed to consider the matter. By mid-August, the first African American doctors were hired for the new hospital and Col. Ward was hired in January 1924 to serve as its director. One of Dr. Ward’s associates, Dr. John A. Kenney, who was physician to Booker T. Washington and an active member of the National Medical Association, was one of a group of Tuskegee Institute doctors who bravely stood up and fought to have the Tuskegee veterans hospital open with African American staff. He did so at great risk to his own life and ultimately moved to New Jersey after his family was terrorized and a cross burned in their front yard. His son, Dr. Howard W. Kenney, later became medical director at VA’s Tuskegee hospital and in 1962 was the first African American to integrate a formerly all-white VA hospital when he became Director at East Orange, NJ, and seven years became VA’s first African American VA Regional Director. Dr. Joseph H. Ward, Tuskegee’s first director, led the new veterans hospital through its tumultuous beginnings, hired top-notch staff, and shaped its success as an all-black hospital. He even proposed medical internships in cooperation with Tuskegee Institute as early as 1925, a generation before a national program was initiated at VA in 1946. He retired in 1936, after 12 years of service and returned to Indianapolis. Dr. Ward lived to see the end of racial integration in VA hospitals and died on December 12, 1956. He was buried at Crown Hill Cemetery in Indianapolis. Tuskegee VA Medical Center, which began as a segregated hospital for African American veterans of World War I, is unique in American history. Its significance and contribution to the story of our nation was recognized on March 19, 2012 when it was listed on the National Register of Historic Places by the Secretary of the Interior. Central Alabama Veterans Health Care System added 2 new photos.
  • 4
    tuskegee,AL
    2 years, 9 months Ago
    http://www.montgomeryadvertiser.com/story/news/local/dispatch/2015/02/26/go-red-event-focuses-heart-health-among-veterans/24089661/
  • 1
    tuskegee,AL
    2 years, 9 months Ago
    Central Alabama Veterans Health Care System shared Maxwell Air Force Base's photo.

10 Most Liked Comments

  • 22
    Central Alabama Veterans Heal..
    tuskegee,AL
    2 years, 10 months Ago
    Construction of the new Health Care Center (HCC) in Montgomery, Alabama is on schedule for completion in June 2015. The 112,000 square foot site will serve as an annex to the Montgomery Campus. The HCC will include primary and specialty care clinics, integrated mental health, dental, physical therapy and occupational therapy. CAVHCS will begin seeing patients in the new HCC in October 2015. Central Alabama Veterans Health Care System added 2 new photos.
  • 16
    Central Alabama Veterans Heal..
    tuskegee,AL
    4 years, 10 months Ago
    VA to Celebrate 90 Years of Service in Tuskegee TUSKEGEE, Ala., (February 4, 2013) -- Central Alabama Veterans Health Care System (CAVCHS) will celebrate 90 years of service by Veterans Affairs Medical Center (VAMC) Tuskegee - February 12, 2013 at 10:30 a.m. by hosting a celebration in the Tuskegee Campus’ Building 90 Theater in keeping with the importance of the day. The Department of Veterans Affairs has a long history of fulfilling President Abraham Lincoln’s mandate ...at the end of the Civil War, "...to care for him who shall have borne the battle and for his widow and his orphan.” From it’s origins as the Treasury Department’s Hospital for Sick and Injured Colored World War Veterans following World War I to today, VA Medical Center Tuskegee has been an active part of history, while providing comfort, aid, a teaching platform and quality care to countless Veterans. Please join us as we honor our past while looking squarely toward the future.
  •  #HonoringVets of Central Alabama and Veterans...
    15
    Central Alabama Veterans Heal..
    tuskegee,AL
    3 years, 1 month Ago
    #HonoringVets of Central Alabama and Veterans everywhere today. Thank you for your service.
  • 9
    Central Alabama Veterans Heal..
    tuskegee,AL
    4 years, 6 months Ago
    MONTGOMERY, Ala. (May 27, 2013) -- Central Alabama Veterans Health Care System (CAVHCS) conducted its annual Memorial Day observance Monday, May 27, on the campus of the Montgomery VA Medical Center. Participants of all ages enjoyed patriotic music from the Capital Sounds Concert Band, the National Anthem sung by Carrie Valentine, a wreath laying ceremony, gun salute and the playing of taps at 3 p.m. during the Moment of Remembrance. This year’s keynote speaker was Air Force Lt. Gen. David S. Fadok, Commander and President, Air University, Maxwell Air Force Base, Ala.
  • 9
    Central Alabama Veterans Heal..
    tuskegee,AL
    4 years, 6 months Ago
    MONTGOMERY, Ala. (May 27, 2013) -- Central Alabama Veterans Health Care System (CAVHCS) conducted its annual Memorial Day observance Monday, May 27, on the campus of the Montgomery VA Medical Center. Participants of all ages enjoyed patriotic music from the Capital Sounds Concert Band, the National Anthem sung by Carrie Valentine, a wreath laying ceremony, gun salute and the playing of taps at 3 p.m. during the Moment of Remembrance. This year’s keynote speaker was Air Force Lt. Gen. David S. Fadok, Commander and President, Air University, Maxwell Air Force Base, Ala. Central Alabama Veterans Health Care System added 6 new photos to the alb**: Memorial Day 2013.
  • 8
    Central Alabama Veterans Heal..
    tuskegee,AL
    4 years, 5 months Ago
    Central Alabama Veterans Health Care System (CAVHCS) will first conduct a Grand Opening of the new Department of Veterans Affairs’ (VA) Community Based Outpatient Clinic (CBOC) in Monroeville, Ala., the morning of July 15 at 10:30, and then conduct a Town Hall Meeting in Monroeville in the afternoon. Scheduled to speak at the grand opening is U.S. Representative Josiah “Jo” Bonner (R – AL 1st District). As a result of the new Monroeville CBOC, Veterans in Alabama’s Southwest Region no longer have to make the almost four hour round trip to CAVHCS’ Medical Centers in Montgomery or Tuskegee, Ala. to receive primary care and ancillary services such as X-ray, laboratory work, and local pharmacy support. Nearly 36 % (2.15 million) of Veteran patients and 15% (902,591) of Veterans with at least one service connected disability are from rural and highly rural areas. About one-third (31 percent) Operation Enduring Freedom and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) who were users of the VA Health Care System in FY12 reside in rural or highly rural areas. The Monroeville CBOC is located at 159 Whetstone Street, Monroeville, AL, 36460, and has been seeing a gradually increasing number of patients since May 20th. Following the Grand Opening Ceremony in the morning, CAVHCS will conduct a Town Hall meeting at 1 p.m., literally across the street from the new CBOC in Saint John Episcopal Church, 200 Whetstone Street, Monroeville, AL 36460. CAVHCS conducts Town Hall Meetings to provide an opportunity for direct dialogue with Veterans and their families, who will be able to discuss their healthcare concerns and initial impressions of the new CBOC directly with CAVHCS leadership. The Veterans Healthcare Administration (VHA) has been actively transitioning from a hospital-based health care system to a more patient centered system rooted in primary care. CBOCs are an important and growing part of the VHA service delivery system. With the creation of CBOCs, VA provides health care services in locations much closer to where its patients live. Eighty-seven percent of VA’s patient population now lives within 30 minutes of a VA medical facility.
  • 8
    Central Alabama Veterans Heal..
    tuskegee,AL
    4 years, 10 months Ago
    National Slaute to Veteran Patients is February 14. Contact Voluntary Service (334) 272-4670 Ext. 4749 for more details.
  • 8
    Central Alabama Veterans Heal..
    tuskegee,AL
    4 years, 11 months Ago
    Wishing everyone a happy and HEALTHY New Year
  • 7
    Central Alabama Veterans Heal..
    tuskegee,AL
    4 years, 7 months Ago
    Central Alabama Veterans Health Care System added a new photo.
  • 7
    Central Alabama Veterans Heal..
    tuskegee,AL
    4 years, 9 months Ago

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